Archive for November, 2010

Ad Review: Kahlua, with Ana de la Reguera

Written by Susan on . Posted in International, Marketing

Ana de la Reguera for Kahlua

Ana de la Reguera for Kahlua

Ad location: National television and YouTube

Medium: Video

Brand: Kahlua

Overall Grade: A

Quick Review: Did you know that Kahlua comes from the Mexican state of Veracruz? I didn’t know that before the most recent TV commercial.  So give it ten gold stars for educational value.  Also, did you know they speak Spanish in Veracruz?  Ok, if you didn’t, Mexican film actress Ana de la Reguera tells you, pronouncing some Spanish words in a very “intriguing” way, and proving that the name “Roberto” is much more sultry than plain old “Robert”.

From the opening shot of Ana de la Reguera (girlfriend of Univision reporter Jorge Ramos) wearing large gold hoop earrings and a stunning green dress, walking through an open-air market, to the last shot of her raising her glass of kahlua with others as a flashbulb is flashed, this commercial grabs your attention and is entertaining through and through.  Yes, if you know Spanish it seems silly that some words like “shoes” and “stapler” would be appealing- but let’s face it, “zapatos” and “engrapadora” sound much more appealing (this was the first time I have heard “engrapadora” instead of “grapadora”, but I understand that both words are equally used).  This ad seems to be part of a trend in silly, over the top messages delivered by attractive spokespeople (see: Old Spice Guy).  And it works.

I like this trend towards ads that manage, in 30 seconds, to make you laugh and reconsider an old brand in a whole new light.  Sipping on kahlua as a way of feeling like you’re on the shores of Mexico?  It’s a smart move.  And I also like that the ad targets the general market with the use of a Latina actress, speaking Spanish mixed with English, in a Mexican setting.  As I said, to Spanish-speakers there is little novelty to the “exotic” words pronounced by de la Reguera, but her beauty can appeal to all audiences.  Well done, Kahlua.  Delicioso.

Home Depot: Hispanics and Marketing Strategy

Written by Xochitl on . Posted in Hispanic, Marketing

Home Depot

Home Depot

Home improvements can be exhausting, especially if you are not a professional. In trying to find a lamp for my son’s room, for example, I decided to go to the first place that came to my mind: Home Depot.

Walking into the store was overwhelming- where do I get started?  Most people were moving fast, looking like they knew what they were doing. On the contrary, I looked like a tourist in New York trying to find a friendly face that could help me find my way around.

My experience immediately changed when I looked up and found that ALL the signs were in both English and Spanish. The Home Depot speaks Español! I felt welcome and comfortable. I speak English, but Spanish will always be my first language.

As a Latina in the U.S., I am excited to find companies such as The Home Depot that recognize the importance of the Hispanic market.  According to The Home Depot Hispanic Marketing Overview, Hispanic consumers spent $21.7B on home improvement in 2009 (Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, 2009).

Also, as a marketing professional, I found it very exciting that The Home Depot Marketing Overview also includes the following strategies:

– Bilingual How-To Clinics conducted through Spanish language radio

– Toll-Free Hotline (1-800-533-3199) that offer toll-free service with a Spanish prompt

– Market-Targeted Advertising: Advertising efforts through television, radio, print
and online, targeted at both consumers and professionals

– Spanish Language Home Depot YouTube Channel: Access to how-to tips from the home improvement leader from home, the laptop or a mobile device

Hispanics are a priority now and in the future of the U.S.  Any business that recognizes and implements smart strategies to reach them will be ahead of the marketing game.

Marketing to Hispanics: All Hat and No Cattle?

Written by Marks on . Posted in Hispanic, Marketing

All Hat and No Cattle?

All Hat and No Cattle?

Although a majority of U.S. businesses say that Hispanics are important to the growth of their companies, very few  are actually marketing to them.

Even though a sizable majority (80%) of US marketers say that the Hispanic market will have a major impact on their products and services in the coming five years, half of them are not marketing specifically to the demographic. This is according to a report earlier this year from legendary independent Hispanic agency Orci.

The agency survey was emailed to 9,300 senior marketers at Fortune 1,000 companies. When the results were tabulated, more than 80% of respondents also said they either do not plan to begin marketing to Hispanics or will not increase their efforts in the next 12 months. This takes into consideration all forms of media. And even though there is very clear evidence that social media and online are accelerating in their use amongst this powerful demographic, the report also found that despite 80% of the Hispanic population using social media, only 20% of marketers are targeting social networks with Hispanic-specific marketing messages. What’s up with that?

So where is the logical disconnect?  Are they really bullish on the Hispanic market or are they simply full of bull? Hard to say, but it clearly indicates a misalignment in strategic thinking if not plain old common sense. In 2008, 46 million U.S. Hispanics accounted for $980 billion in spending power, according to market research firm Packaged Facts. That number will increase to $1.3 billion by 2013. Seems like there are lot of companies that need to get their lassos out and start working the ranch before all of the cattle are out of the barn (and yes, there is probably a “brand” pun in there somewhere)!

The Unserved Market Left by Mexicana Airlines

Written by Xochitl on . Posted in Digital, International, Marketing

Visit Mexico

Visit Mexico

On August 28 of this year, Nuevo Grupo Aeronautico (NGA) suspended all Mexicana Airlines operations due to financial insolvency and the failure of negotiations that could have helped them transition to a new acquisition or transfer. The group of companies includes: Compania Mexicana de Aviacion (CMA), MexicanaClick and MexicanaLink.

At the international level, there is a tremendous opportunity for major airlines, including Volaris, Alaska Airlines, and Continental Airlines, among others, to pick up the traffic of travelers that were left without options for getting to Mexico.  At the national Level, AeroMexico, Interjet and Volaris are expected to cover most national routes within Mexico.

The challenge for these airlines will be how to reach out to these travelers. How can they build their brand name and trust for the traveler to Mexico? In my opinion, the most popular way to shop for airline tickets is the internet. Whatever airline comes up with the most effective digital campaign will definitely be the most successful of all.