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Author Archive

Susan

A Mexican-American from San Rafael, California, Susan Ayoob holds a B.A. in Literature from UC Santa Cruz and a Masters in Translation from the Monterey Institute of International Studies. She has lived in Spain, France and Mexico, and thus has an appreciation for Manchego, Camembert, and Cotija.

Social Media Marketing Done Wrong

Written by Susan on . Posted in Digital, Marketing, Social Media

Eat24

Eat24

The food delivery app Eat 24 recently broke up with Facebook, and boy, it was more than a conscious uncoupling. In its trademark tongue-in-cheek style, Eat24 uses humor and plenty of outside evidence (such as the video below) to describe its frustration with Facebook’s changes to its fan page algorithm. It remains to be seen whether other companies will follow suit and abandon fan pages on Facebook altogether, like Eat24 has done. But their boldness has struck a nerve and let the social media world know that Facebook is no longer king when it comes to interacting with followers via social media. As Eat24 states in the now-famous blog post, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr have not placed barriers to fan interaction the way Facebook has.

Honey Maid Redefines Wholesome

Written by Susan on . Posted in Marketing

Honey Maid: This is Wholesome

Honey Maid: This is Wholesome

All of a sudden, there is one 30-second spot I have seen a lot recently on television and online for Honey Maid, a division of Mondelez International. The brief ad has a theme, “this is wholesome”, and highlights several loving families. What makes the ad distinctive is that the families it showcases include a single father and his son, a tattooed musician and his family, an interracial family, a military family, and a family with two gay fathers. In 2014 it should not be noteworthy that such families should be shown in a national ad campaign, but it is, and it is heartening to see.

Although the campaign is not Hispanic-focused per se, it seems relevant to those of us who work in Hispanic marketing because we are always questioning the concept of general market and total market.

Pizza Patron: Badass Marketing

Written by Susan on . Posted in Marketing

Pizza Patrón uses a questionable word, chingona, to promote its new pizza.

Pizza Patrón uses a questionable word, chingona, to promote its new pizza.

We have previously written in Reach Hispanic about Pizza Patron’s unique approach to reaching the Hispanic market. This earlier article, “Pizza Patron’s Secret to Success”, noted 3 keys to the Dallas-based pizza chain’s success: find out what is special to your target market, understand your market’s cultural preferences, and focus on the experience/feel of the brand and company. Pizza Patron appears to have followed all of these rules in launching its latest offering, a pizza loaded with extra jalapeños. It is a pizza called “La Chingona”.

Your reaction to those two words will reveal a lot about your familiarity with Mexican Spanish as it is used today. NPR notes that some find the word to be vulgar and cringe at its use, while others think it is merely synonymous with cool (one expert quoted likens it to the American English word “badass”).

Spanish-Specific Domain Names

Written by Susan on . Posted in Digital, Marketing

Go Daddy now offers the .uno domain for the Spanish-speaking world

Go Daddy now offers the .uno domain for the Spanish-speaking world

When we talk about opportunities for reaching the Hispanic market, we usually speak of these opportunities as they relate to advertisers and government agencies.

GoDaddy has recently shown that even companies like the domain registrar and site builder can target the Hispanic market with a niche product offering. Specifically, they are offering the .uno domain for the global Hispanic community.

Shaul Jolles, of Dot Latin (no, .latin is not yet available as a domain), breathlessly states that .UNO will be the first new top level domain to launch that will globally connect and unite Hispanic and Latino communities, businesses, consumers, and individuals in support of a multicultural and multilingual Internet…”. To me, the previous statement is contradictory. How can a distinctly unique domain for one linguistic community support a multilingual internet? More importantly, does it really matter what domain a company or individual uses?

Covered California Needs Latinos

Written by Susan on . Posted in Marketing, U.S. Hispanic

Covered California

Covered California

In order for Obamacare to be successful, it needs large enrollment from two key groups: young people and Latinos. California has plenty of both, so it is critical for uninsured Latinos in the state to enroll in the program. Unfortunately, those charged with attracting Latinos in the state to sign up have faced some setbacks in reaching this important market.

Bessie Ramirez of Santiago Solutions Group notes in KPBS that there were several missteps in the initial marketing campaign to Latinos.