If You Love Tourism, You’ll Love Chile

Written by Eduardo Reyes on . Posted in Americas, Marketing, South America

Chile

Chile

More and more foreigners are visiting Chile, a country with a scenic diversity that few countries have. In 2014, more than 3.6 million tourists entered the country. Among them, North American tourists grew 5.4% in 2014, reaching 162,356. And the reasons are many.

If you feel inspired by love, Fodor’s Travel, a place that specializes in travel, named Chile one of the 15 must-see places to spend your honeymoon.

Latin America’s Creative Advertising

Written by Fernando Rosales Aguilar on . Posted in Americas, Central America, Marketing, South America

Anuncio Galleta Tipo Riviana Pozuelo

Anuncio Galleta Tipo Riviana Pozuelo

Latin America stands out for its creative people, and its advertisements are no exception.

As we all know, advertising should be innovative and memorable so that the product that is being announced has consumer appeal. Something curious happened in 1994: a Costa Rican company released an ad promoting its cookie, which led to a complete boom around Central America. What was the appeal of the ad?: it consisted of a romantic song, which made it to Salvadoran radio, where it was heard by a Salvadoran woman who dedicated it to her partner.

Let’s Get Your Third Oscar, Argentina!

Written by Maria Pia Kirk on . Posted in Americas, Marketing, South America

Wild Tales Trailer

Wild Tales Trailer

Although several countries in Latin America have been Oscar-nominated for Best Foreign Film in the past, Argentina is the only country to win the prize. And this year, Argentina could take home its third Oscar with “Wild Tales”.

It took its first Oscar in the year 1985 with the movie “The Official Story”, which tells the story of a history professor married to a soldier during the last civil-military dictatorship in Argentina.

Colombia Partners with Internet.org

Written by Maria Pia Kirk on . Posted in Americas, Marketing, South America, Technology

Internet.org

Internet.org

On January 14 President of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, and Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook Founder and CEO, announced an Internet.org partnership with Colombia to provide free Internet services to all Colombians.

“Before today, only about 50% of Colombians had access to the internet. By launching the Internet.org app on the Tigo network today, we’re giving people free access to basic internet services,” wrote Mark Zuckerberg on his Facebook page.

Internet.org, founded in 2013 by Zuckerberg, was created to bring Internet access to the two-thirds of the total population who do not have Internet access. It gives users access to free basic services in areas of education, health, communication, jobs, finance, and local information. For the full list of free services available in Colombia, read the Internet.org press release.

The Threat to the Chilean Digital System

Written by Eduardo Reyes on . Posted in Americas, Digital, Marketing, South America, Technology

Caution: Switch off internet in cases of political dissent

Caution: Switch off internet in cases of political dissent

In July of 2014, a group of Chilean Parliament members presented a report to Congress stating that the first digital newspaper in Chile was El Mostrador, which in 2003 was also recognized by a body of government. Just a few years earlier in 2001, the same Congress passed Law N° 19.733 which regulates freedom of opinion and information, the exercise of journalism, and social media. These laws widened legislation’s reach to protecting the corresponding good use of media, regardless of the platform (physical or digital).

The same group of Congress members, after revealing their intention to various players within the sector, has proposed to modify the above-mentioned law so that: everyone who has a website or social network with four weekly posts or publications is considered responsible for a social medium. Up to this point it might sound like a reasonable idea, but when you look at the possible consequences, it’s clearly not about a simple modification. According to the judgment of Rayén Campusano, lawyer at the University of Chile, the proposal would mean, among other implications: